NORWEGIAN BEER YOU SHOULD TRY AFTER A CLIMB.

NORWEGIAN BEER:

As we all know drinking beer, and being part of the rock climbing community goes hand in hand. Name one climber who does not enjoy a cold one after being on the rock for a few hours /days?

Disclaimer:

First things first don´t drink alcohol during or before you climb as i recommend that you are stone cold sober when you hit that rock. You need all of your senses intact in case something unforseen happens. However as you finish, and maybe pack up your gear for the night something cold in hand is aloud. 

Norwegian beer:

Interest in (and thirst for…) craft beer in Norway has skyrocketed. New microbreweries are entering the scene virtually every month, and are already collecting international awards.

The trend really exploded in Norway about four or five years ago. Many people are now very conscious about what beer they drink, they experiment with different kinds and tastes, and even try their hand at brewing at home.When you start scratching the surface of the world of beer, there’s so much fun to latch onto. After a while, you’ll start to taste and experience beer in a whole new way.

The brewing process:

The main ingredient in beer is malt – that is, sprouted and dried grains, primarily barley. A malt house sprouts and dries the grains, to develop the enzymes that will be important in the brewing process. We then crush the malt, and mix it with hot water, resulting in a kind of porridge, called mash.

In the mash, those enzymes turn starch into malt sugar (or maltose). The resulting liquid is known as wort. The wort is then boiled, and you add hops at certain times to get the right aroma, bitterness and taste. Hops are like spices for beer.

The wort is then cooled to the correct fermentation temperature (anywhere from 8 to 25 degrees Celsius, depending on the beer), and you add yeast. Over the next few days the yeast will eat the sugar, to produce alcohol, carbon dioxide and flavour.

Kinn 

Lindheim Beer company 

Nøgne Ø 

Håndbryggeri 

Småvesen 

Inderøy Gårdsbryggeri 

Gøtt mikrobryggeri 

There are probably a lot more types, and brewery´s you can try in Norway but these are the once I can tell you with certainty are good.

More links here:

The Oslo Book

Science Nordic